The
Philomathean
Society

Keats and Beats

Keats and Beats

Poetry!

K&B is all about poetry – reading it, writing it, talking about it. Everybody is always welcome, so be sure to tell all of your friends, because it really is better with people other than the usual band of suspects.

Seriously, Keats and Beats thrives upon the diversity of its contributors, and the more contributors, the better the chances that we won’t have to hear The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock at every single K&B. I love that poem as much or more than any one, but come on… to be read every two weeks at the same event? That’s not what T.S. Eliot meant… that’s not what he meant at all.

The next question that springs forth from the ever bubbling fountains of the minds who hear this spiel is: can I read my own?

And my answer, that I shall spout from the highest peak, from coast to coast, is a resounding YES! Please, you are all encouraged to read your own poetry. That is one of the most special things about K&B: many closet poets come out in the cozy atmosphere that meets semimonthly that is Keats and Beats.

Check out postings below about upcoming and past Keats and Beats events, as well as a few poems!

Keats and Beats: Leslie Shinn

Screen Shot 2013-03-21 at 1.32.11 PM](/images/kandb/Screen-Shot-2013-03-21-at-1.32.11-PM.png)

5:00pm Wednesday, November 19th | Philomathean Hall, 4th Floor College Hall (Please enter by the East Entrance, across from Fisher Fine Arts Library)

Leslie Shinn is the coordinator of the College Biochemistry Program and Vagelos Molecular Life Science Program. She ALSO published a book of poems, Inside Spiders, which won the Lexi Rudnitsky Book Prize in 2013. Come for a reading and discussion!

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Keats & Beats: Ὀδύσσεια for Our Time Too

PosterK&B35:00PM Monday, Apr. 21st | Philomathean Hall, 4th Floor College Hall (Please enter by the East Entrance, across from Fisher Fine Arts Library)

Are you Team Fagles or Team Rieu? Join Professor Emily Wilson to discuss the translation of Homeric verse and compelling depictions of epic violence. The talk will include passages from her current project: a new English rendering of the Odyssey itself.

Keats & Beats encourages the campus’s young poets; supports established poets; and stimulates passionate discussion of poetry. We view poetry as an ongoing conversation, and honor poetry’s oral roots through readings and panels. All of our events are free and open to the public.

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Keats and Beats: Soundings: An Evening with William Logan

FACEBOOK FORMAT8:00PM Tuesday, Dec. 17th | Philomathean Hall, 4th Floor College Hall (Please enter by the East Entrance, across from Fisher Fine Arts Library)

Soundings: An Evening with William Logan

Join Keats & Beats as we take a break from finals with celebrated poet, critic, and professor William Logan. In an age dominated by free verse, Prof. Logan attends carefully to sound, frequently writing in meter and rhyme to show how effective such forms can be. As Prof. Logan has explained, “Poetry goes back to primitive roots, when sound was memory (hence the mnemonic resources of meter and rhyme).” And as Richard Tillinghast has written in the New York Times Book Review, “Mr. Logan writes with vigor, almost classical restraint and a fine sense of musicality.” Christian Wiman, until this year the editor of Poetry magazine, says of Prof. Logan, “For breadth of intelligence, an incisive style, and pure passion, I don’t think he can be matched.” Prof. Logan has won many awards and accolades for his poetry and criticism, including the Lavan Award, the J. Howard and Barbara M.J. Wood Prize, and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism.

Keats & Beats encourages the campus’s young poets; supports established poets; and stimulates passionate discussion of poetry. We view poetry as an ongoing conversation, and honor poetry’s oral roots through readings and panels. All of our events are free and open to the public.

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Keats & Beats: (Im)penetrable Beauty: Difficult Poems

Screen Shot 2013-03-21 at 1.32.11 PM6:00PM Monday, Sept. 23th | Philomathean Hall, 4th Floor College Hall (Please enter by the East Entrance, across from Fisher Fine Arts Library)

A Panel Discussion with Charles Bernstein, Julia Bloch and Bob Perelman

What draws us to difficult poems, and what makes them worthwhile? We’ve assembled a panel of distinguished poets and Penn professors—Charles Bernstein, Julia Bloch, and Bob Perelman—to help us understand the smarmy appeal of the thorny poem. What do the particular experiences of poets like Wallace Stevens, Ezra Pound, and H.D. tell us about poetry and the nature of reality? To what extent do we expect poems to depict a recognizable reality? How do poems pull away from recognizable realities to depict with greater fidelity an inner reality? How do poets navigate the relationship between meaning and sound? Join us for an evening of discussion and refreshments as we make the beauty in difficult poems penetrable.

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Keats and Beats: The Long 19th

Screen Shot 2013-03-21 at 1.32.11 PM6:00PM Tuesday, April 9nd | Philomathean Hall, 4th Floor College Hall (Please enter by the East Entrance, across from Fisher Fine Arts Library)

Spring flowers breed poetic powers! Last time we invited Charles Bernstein, very much a contemporary poet. For this iteration of Keats and Beats, our gaze turns back to the long 19th century, the period of Keats and developments after him. April 9th is Baudelaire’s birthday. Baudelaire is one of the preeminent French lyric poets, and his poems are a concentrated dose of the mentality of the long 19th. We will be reading some of his poems, and please bring your favorites from the period. Feel free also to bring your own poetry!

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Unknown5:30 PM PhST Friday, Februrary 15th | Philomathean Hall, 4th Floor College Hall (Please enter by the East Entrance, across from Fisher Fine Arts Library)

Mulled cider, pears and honey, poetry… what do these all have in common? They are excellent in the winter! Join the Philomathean Society for the resurrection of Keats and Beats, our ever-popular poetry series! This time, we will have Charles Bernstein, the Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Penn and an accomplished poet, reading and discussing his poetry. As always, we also invite you to bring your own poetry!

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Keats and Beats: Elizabeth Bishop and MGMT100 with Anne Greenhalgh

Philomathean Halls | Tuesday, February 22, 6pm

The Philomathean Society presents a discussion with Dr. Anne Greenhalgh on the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop and Management 100. We will sample the works of the poet laureate and Dr. G will discuss the influence of Bishop on her research and MGMT 100. We will bring the evening to reflective and enjoyable conclusion with a participative exercise.

Refreshments will be provided

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Keats and Beats: Mad Men and Frank O’Hara

6.00 PM, Monday 8 November 2010 | Philomathean Halls, 4th floor College Hall

(No previous Mad Men viewing experience required!)
The Philomathean Society presents a discussion with Amy Paeth on the uses and abuses of Frank O’Hara on the television series MAD MEN. In the 50s and 60s O’Hara was a gay socialite of the art world; for the most part, his poetry circulated among close-knit coteries of friends & lovers. It seems unlikely that cutthroat ad execs like the show’s protagonists would be out buying “Meditations in an Emergency” – yet how and why O’Hara used as a literary ‘prop’ in the television drama? The discussion will include clips from the television series as well as selections ofO’Hara’s poetry.

Refreshments will be provided.

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Tuesday 26 October 2010 | Philomathean Halls, 4th Floor College Hall

Come to Philo and discuss underground poetry of the 1980s in the USSR, in particular, the Moscow Conceptualist group (including Dmitry Prigov, Lev Rubinshtein, Timur Kibirov and others). These were poets who were oriented on deflation of the ideological cliches of the Soviet regime, but also of much else, by means of humor and ironic play.

Speaker: Kevin Platt
Snacks: Plentiful

Kevin M. F. Platt is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Graduate Chair of the Comparative Literature Program. He works on representations of Russian history, Russian historiography, and history and memory in Russia. Additionally, he frequently writes on Russian lyric poetry. Platt received his B.A. from Amherst College and his Ph.D. from Stanford University and taught at Pomona College before joining the Penn faculty in 2002. He is the author of History in a Grotesque Key: Russian Literature and the Idea of Revolution (Stanford, 1997; Russian edition 2006), and the co-editor (with David Brandenberger) of Epic Revisionism: Russian History and Literature as Stalinist Propaganda (Wisconsin UP, 2006). Platt has published chapters and articles on Russian history and historiography, film, art and the poetry of Pushkin, Boriatinsky, Pasternak, Zabolotsky, Chukovsky, Golynko and Kibirov. He also edited and contributed translations to Modernist Archaist: Selected Poems by Osip Mandelstam (Whale and Star, 2008) and edited Intimations: Selected Poetry by Anna Akhmatova, translated by James Falen (Whale and Star, 2010). He is currently putting the final touches on a book entitled Terror and Greatness: Ivan IV and Peter I, as Russian Myths (forthcoming from Cornell UP in 2011). His new projects include a critical historiography of Russia, study of contemporary culture and social life in Latvia and Russia and a translation project on Marina Tsvetaeva.

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Keats and Beats: Madness and Gladness

6:00 PM, Tuesday 21 September 2010 | Philomathean Halls, 4th Floor College Hall

“Madness and Gladness: Mental Health and Poetic Prowess in the Autobiographical Works of Cowper, Roethke, Plath, and Beyond”
Featuring Lance Wahlert — Department of Medical Ethics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

How do we define what is normal and what is pathological? Who in society is best suited to determine the mental health of an individual: the person in question, the clinician, his/her loved ones, or the community at large? And how do poetical, autobiographical voices on mental health complicate or clarify this scenario? In examining poems by authors such as William Cowper, Theodore Roethke, Sylvia Plath, and others, this lecture will consider two chief questions:
– Does poetry (in its stylistic forms and its inherent lyricism) occasion a display of the more intimate and accurate feelings of persons dealing with mental illness?
– Or does poetry (in its economy of language and its generic conventions) render such ideas more cryptic and more alienating to a general readership?
For this session of “Keats & Beats,” we will read and discuss multiple works by poets who address the very mental health concerns addressed above. No reading is required in advance. Rather, in conversation, we will seek to understand popular and professional explanations of mental disorders rooted in cultural, religious, and intellectual frameworks as they are considered explicitly through poetry.

Lance Wahlert is Associate Fellow in the Center for Bioethics at The University of Pennsylvania and an affiliated faculty member in the Departments of English, Cinema Studies, and the History of Science and Medicine at Penn. In addition to teaching in the Master of Bioethics Program, he also serves (with Autumn Fiester) as the founding Co-Director of the Project on Bioethics, Sexuality, and Gender Identity that focuses on the intersection of LGBTQI issues and medical ethics. In addition to earning his Ph.D. in English at Penn, Lance is a graduate of The Johns Hopkins University with a B.A. in English literature and an M.A. in Humanities specializing in Irish poetry and medical history. He also earned a First Class Honors M.Sc. in History of Science and Medicine from The Imperial College of Medicine (London), as well as the dissertation prize for his thesis on the cultural history of homosexuality in German, British, and North American cinemas. Lance’s work focuses on the bioethical implications of LGBTQ health policy, the impact of cinematic genres on cultural histories, the authority of medical iconography in art and media, and the relationship between literary narratives and visual forms of storytelling.

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