The
Philomathean
Society

In Print

Philo in Print & Press

Over the years, many newspapers and magazines have published articles describing Philo, its ways, and activities. While putting this website together, we stumbled accross a few of them, and thought it might be fun to include them here. When you get tired of reading about Philo, come over to one of our meetings and decide for yourself what it is all about.

The Pennsylvania Gazette

1977: “Philo still has a nice, eccentric quality about it”

“It’s the usual story,” says Cynthia Frost, ’77 FAS. “People don’t learn of Philomathean until they’ve been here for a while” …

1990: “Helluva good time”

The Philomathean Society, which advertises itself as the organization that allowed Penn students to raise Hell with their brains …

1997: “One Night at Philo…”

Members responded with phrases including “Four score and seven years ago,” “They’re magically delicious,” and “I can’t believe it’s not butter!

1998: “High Above College Green, Close to the Stars”

As it approaches its second century, the venerable Philomathean Society regains its past, charts its future — and maintains its own unique brand of fun.

Congressional Record
October 1978: “Tribute to the Philomathean Society”

Mr. Speaker, today marks the 165th anniversary of the founding of the Philomathean Society …

The General Magazine and Historical Chronicle:
1956: “The Mind You Find May Be Your Own”

It is my belief that the objectives of this University association of ours are more subtle and less obvious than are often conceived …

Penn Parents
Spring 2008: “The Philomathean Society: Mixing Wit with Wisdom”

“I was hanging out with a friend and heard about a tea,” Daniel recalls. “There was Philo, and I was enlightened.”

The Daily Pennsylvanian
March 28, 1988: “Philomatheans celebrate 175 years of intellectual rowdiness”

[The Society] gives its members an outlet for creativity and service which they would get nowhere else.

December 1, 2011: “Philos Raise Hell With Their Brains,” 34th Street Magazine:

The Philomathean Society’s members’ earnest pursuit of knowledge can sometimes differentiate them from their peers. Philos are some serious young people, the sort that are “historians” not “majoring in history.”